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30
Mar

Why Wild Onion, why?


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We ran into each other at the grocery store. She gave me a hearty “hello!”, I returned greeting and a smile. Then she took a deep breath and blurted “Your wild onions are making me crazy. Every time I drive by your house, I want to stop and pull them all for you.”

 

The silence between us hung heavy like a late July peach.

I smiled again. What else could I do? A busy Spring job, and well, I am not a Wild Onion Hater. Now, before you gasp, please note that I do pull them if they happen to be in my way. BUT I don’t go out of my way to pull them.

I imagined a clump of Wild Onions happily growing in the warming soil. Considered a weed, its fate was in the hands of the gardener…literally. And “haha anyway…go ahead…pull” they snickered, “you’ll never get all of me.”

It has the same sort of job as the beloved Crocus. It is a spring welcomer. With lower lip trembling, it just couldn’t figure out why it too wasn’t in the beloved category. Fresh green, fine textured foliage when little else was waking up. But the gardener’s fever needs something to do. And there, right there, and how dare they, were sprouts and sprouts of “weeds” just begging to be pulled. And oh no! You didn’t sprout yourself all over in my I-want-a-perfect-lawn lawn. And furthermore, how dare they smell like food and not be food.

Oh wait, they ARE food. With positive identification, (hollow stem, onion smell), the tops can be used as chives, and the bulbs can be washed and used just as any other onion would be used in the kitchen!

By summertime they are dormant, the foliage disappears. How funny that these little clumps cause such an uproar, when we should be glad to see spring growing. How not so funny that people waste time and money buying chemicals to try to kill them.

You too Forsythia- how dare you be everywhere and so sturdy that even non-gardeners can grow you. And how dare you burst on to the scene to announce spring’s arrival- scheeeese. Could you tone it down a bit? You are just too much.

Just sayin’. ~Erica

Comments 

 
#3 Erica 2013-04-07 10:51
Yes, they are edible, just make sure you have the identification right. Hollow stems, and of course the fragrance of onions! :) I just chopped a bunch over an omelet last night!
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#2 Susan 2013-04-06 15:40
I love this! What a great way to look at wild onions. Seriously though, you can eat thrm? We've been googling for years trying to figure out if it is possible.
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#1 Lisa 2013-03-31 09:08
If they are just a sign of Spring and will go dormant anyway and they aren't hurting anything else let them grow! Like you said you can't get them all anyway!
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